What Would Gertz Think?

Process Post #6

This week I was tasked with reviewing the design of a fellow student’s blog, so I wanted to look at my own blog with the same lens and talk about what Gertz (2015) might think of my design.

In my peer review, I talked about how Gertz describes a sort of “copycat culture” where everyone wants their site to look like the sleek, cool pages of Google and Apple etc. So, we all end up with similar looking sites. Obviously, the use of themes on WordPress leads to the risk that we all might have common layouts and themes; however, I hope that I have been able to make my blog unique from the original theme. I’ve moved around and deleted certain headers and menus, tried to create a unique colour palate and homey feel that carries on throughout the site, and I’ve chosen to use dark mode because as a reader myself, I love the ease of viewing it gives. I think I certainly have more work to do in getting away from the copycat issue, just as a result of using a theme.

I feel like I’ve put a lot of myself and my heart into this blog thus far, just as Gertz asks (2015). I’ve tried to design and write with my personality and soul, and I hope that comes through to the reader.

In terms of smaller things to change, I think I could try to minimize the number of fonts used on my blog. Just as Our recent guest speaker, Mauvé Page was talking about in her guest lecture, I don’t want to seem inconsistent or messy, so I’m going to look into minimizing how many fonts I use, though I might be limited with the theme I’ve chosen. Additionally, I could possibly have too much blank space on my blog, or it might seem that way because I use my homepage for a place to have all of my posts instead of a normal home page, which I could consider making.

In general, I’m happy with how my blog is going thus far, and I’m excited to see what my fellow peer review partner has to say, and what improvements I could possibly make from that feedback.

References:

Gertz, Travis. 2015. “Design Machines. How to survive in the digital Apocalypse.” July 2015. Available from: https://louderthanten.com/articles/story/design-machines

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